Brain surgery, science and education


As a pediatric neurosurgeon, neuroscientist, and educator, I come across many interesting bits of information and wonderful people. I will try to share some of this with you here. While the site draws heavily from my experiences as the Campagna Chair of Pediatric Neurosurgery at Oregon Health & Science University, and head of neurosurgery at Doernbecher Children's Hospital, this is a personal blog. My thanks to my wonderful OHSU colleagues, who share this exciting and rewarding work with me.


Friday, March 15, 2013

OHSU Neurosurgery Residency 2013 Match


It is a true pleasure to announce the outstanding results of the OHSU 2013 Neurosurgery Residency Program Match. OHSU matched two residents this year, following our complement increase in 2012 to three and two residents on an alternating year schedule:

Dr. Carli Bullis, MD, holds undergraduate degrees in both biology and history from Indiana University in Bloomington, and is completing her medical degree at the IU School of Medicine where she is a member of the AOA honors society. As a medical student, she conducted research on the radiographic anatomy of pediatric spine surgery. At IU, she was a silver medalist at the US Figure Skating Intercollegiate National Championships.

Dr. Lauren Simpson, MD, studied neuroscience as an undergraduate at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and earned a Master of Public Health degree at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is completing her medical degree at Duke University, where she is a Dean’s Tuition Scholarship Merit Award winner. She has participated in and written about medical care capacity building in the underdeveloped world.

Our program is proud of the outstanding quality of the medical graduates who come to OHSU to train in neurological surgery. OHSU neurosurgery residents are amongst the most accomplished and capable in the country.

With this year’s match, we believe that the OHSU program now also represents the highest number (7) and highest proportion (47%) of female residents in any of the 101 accredited U.S. residency programs. This proportion is almost identical to that of women graduating from U.S. medical schools (48%), and dramatically higher than the percentage of women neurosurgery residents currently training in the U.S. (12%), or entering accredited residency programs each year (20%).

The OHSU neurological surgery residency program is fortunate to attract top applicants of either gender and of various cultural backgrounds. Increasingly, the residents we train resemble the rich and diverse population that they will care for. Each of our residents strive to meet and surpass the rigorous criteria for hard work, compassionate care, and excellence required by the personally demanding and technically challenging field of neurosurgery. Each of them defines what it takes to succeed in this terrific profession.

Carli Bullis

Lauren Simpson

1 comment:

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